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Don't Eat With Your Mouth Full

Where can we live but days?

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steepholm steepholm
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To Blame, to Thank, and Others?
[I just posted this in the linguaphiles community, but it may interest some here.]

I've been trying to think of other contemporary English constructions that work like "to blame" in the sentence, "Who is to blame for this mess?" - where there is an implied passive (i.e. "who is to be blamed?").

So far, I can't think of any good examples. The nearest I've got is "to thank", albeit it sounds a little archaic: "Who is to thank for this mess?"

Interestingly, while this sounds semi-acceptable where "thank" acts as an ironic synonym for "blame", as in the above example, to my ear it sounds less so when used unironically: "Who is to thank for the lovely bouquet I found on my desk this morning?" This leads me to wonder whether its semi-acceptability in the negative example derives from a kind of semantic resonance with "to blame".

Anyway, I'd be interested in further examples or thoughts on this in general.
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Both of those make sense to me: they're just a kind of telescoped relative clause with the infinitive standing in for most of the stuff in the clause itself. "The one to see about passports" is tighter than "the one whom a person should see about passports."