Don't Eat With Your Mouth Full

Where can we live but days?

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Talking of Gamekeepers
Recently I had to learn the kanji for "decay", which consists of a tree and a snare:

decay


I found that the best way to make it stick was to retrieve a memory from my teenage years, when, wandering alone through the snowy woods near my home, and having stumbled onto someone's private land, I found myself face to face with the wizened corpses of a keeper's gibbet - not unlike the one in this stock image:

keeper's gibbet


If I'd been considering a career as a keeper myself, this mustelidae massacre would certainly have put me off, though I appreciate its effectiveness as a mnemonic (and I like to think the weasels would have been happy about that too); but now I wonder why gamekeepers feel the need for such grisly displays. It can hardly be "pour encourager les autres", after all.

AAArgh! That takes me right back to junior school, and the reading-aloud of The Little Grey Men by 'BB'. There's a scene where the gnomes come across a gamekeeper's gibbet; and on it hang the remains of one of their animal friends.

Cue 20-odd 8-yr olds in complete trauma.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Little_Grey_Men

I'm only glad that I didn't recognize any of the animals on the one I saw.

That's disgusting. :o(

I think "feel" should be "felt"; I am only aware of the practice from childhood reading of books that were already old, not from direct experience of my father's and grandfather's work as gamekeepers.

I can only tell you that there was one extant in Hampshire, circa. 1977, because I almost ran into it!

I too have seen foxes and crows hung up on fences, certainly into the late 70s, possibly early 80s. Nothing quite a grisly as the gibbet in the photo in the post, but sometimes several poor little corpses. :(

I, too, saw one in the mid to late 1970s, in my case somewhere in the Peak District.

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