Don't Eat With Your Mouth Full

Where can we live but days?

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1809 Apples
Alas, the original Bramley apple tree, planted in 1809, is dying. I was amazed to find (a few years ago) that it was even alive, but now I feel robbed. Damn you, 2016!

We owe that wonderfully tart cooking apple to a young girl, Mary Ann Brailsford, who planted the original pips - just around the time the ten-year-old Mary Anning began scouring Charmouth beach for ichthyosaurs. 1809 is also the year in which Tom Stoppard's Arcadia is set, featuring the precocious Thomasina Coverly with her anticipations of chaos theory and the second law of thermodynamics - a figure no less impressive for being fictional. Ada Lovelace and Grace Darling wouldn't be born for another six years, but I can't help feeling that there's an earlier squad of bad-ass nineteenth-century girls here (call them the Mostly Marys) who really need to be given life by Kate Beaton, or possibly Henry Darger - if he hadn't died half a lifetime ago.

but I can't help feeling that there's an earlier squad of bad-ass nineteenth-century girls here (call them the Mostly Marys) who really need to be given life by Kate Beaton, or possibly Henry Darger - if he hadn't died half a lifetime ago.

"The Apples of 1809" would be a great title for the first volume of their collected adventures. They can fight crime, if by "crime" you mean "most of the nineteenth century."

They can fight crime, if by "crime" you mean "most of the nineteenth century."

That's exactly what I mean by it!

That's exactly what I mean by it!

Make it happen!

I love this so much.

Nine

I love this so much.

Meanwhile, I seem to have the Watersons' "Apple Tree Wassail" stuck in my head in a Bramley-memorial kind of way.

I have been mourning this very tree today. In October, I was given nascent incentives to pursue further apple tourism, but had not actually gotten around to seeing anything (I visited the tomb of Richard Cox, which is in Harmondsworth, he of Cox's Orange Pippin fame.)

What a beautiful tree! and yes, one more strike against this year.

Actually, the girl in Arcadia was inspired by Ada Lovelace. So, not so surprising. :-) Oh, and we have our own Grace Darling here, Grace Bussell. Her family gave their name to the pretty seaside town of Busselton in Western Australia and one Christmas Day, the teenage Grace helped to rescue a bunch of stranded folk from a shipwreck. She lived happily ever after, though, unlike her British namesake - she received an award and her story in the newspapers brought her a husband, a young man who rode a long distance to meet her. They have descendants who are winemakers.

Actually, the girl in Arcadia was inspired by Ada Lovelace. So, not so surprising. :-)

Ah, that makes sense. Though, given that Byron is an important off-stage presence in the play, I suppose we can't identify the two entirely.

That's very old. Our orchard is about 100 years old and many of the trees are on their last legs.

There were giants in those days.

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